Bruce Shillingsworth reveals problem with Indigenous Voice to Parliament rallies

A radical Aboriginal campaigner who gatecrashed a rally backing the Voice to Parliament has pointed out a glaring problem with such marches. 

Bruce Shillingsworth, who opposes the Voice, said there were ‘just a few First Nations brothers and sisters’ among the 15,000 crowd at the Sydney rally on Sunday.

Some 200,000 people across Australia joined in on the marches held across the country with demonstrations unfolding in cities such as Melbourne and Canberra.

Shillingsworth, who is out on bail awaiting sentencing after being convicted of a serious crime, told news.com.au Indigenous people at the march ‘stuck out like a sore thumb’.

He said the rallies were full of ‘nice non-Indigenous people thinking they have the right to speak for First Nations people’. 

He previously described the campaign to enshrine an Indigenous Voice in Australia’s constitution – which is being voted on on October 14 – as ‘nothing but tokenism’. 

A radical Aboriginal campaigner who attended a rally backing an Indigenous Voice to Parliament on Sunday (pictured) has pointed out a glaring problem with such marches - there were few Indigenous people at them

A radical Aboriginal campaigner who attended a rally backing an Indigenous Voice to Parliament on Sunday (pictured) has pointed out a glaring problem with such marches – there were few Indigenous people at them

Shillingsworth recorded a video of the rally and spoke to the camera as residents marched behind him at Redfern on the weekend.

‘As you can see this is the Yes campaign,’ he said.

‘What we’re currently seeing is all these nice non-Indigenous people thinking they have the right to say for First Nations people.

‘Now vice versa we know that First Nations people would never ever think about having a say over non Indigenous people.’

On September 4, Shillingsworth was found guilty of aiding and abetting arson by coordinating protesters, directing someone to conceal cameras and linking with other protesters to stop police from extinguishing a fire at Old Parliament House. 

The blaze, on December 30, 2021, caused $5.3 in damage after being deliberately lit. 

The prosecution alleged the day before the incident Shillingsworth, 32, encouraged people to ‘make a stand’ and ‘come here and let’s knock this door down’. 

Social media footage shown in court showed him on the portico of the building delivering an emotive speech to fellow protesters.

‘We can break down any door. Doors of injustice. Doors of genocide. Doors that they take our children and hide ’em behind,’ he could be heard saying.

In another video from December 29, 2021, Shillingworth made reference to the ‘eviction papers’ the group posted on the doors of Old Parliament House.

‘We served that notice. An immediate notice of eviction… We tell them they must move out immediately,’ he said in the video, played to the court.

In CCTV and body camera footage from December 30, Shillingsworth was identified as part of the crowd blocking police attempts to reach the fire.

Shillingsworth, who had pleaded not guilty, argued the events of the day were simply a cultural ceremony.

On September 4, Bruce Shillingsworth (pictured) was found guilty of aiding and abetting arson by coordinating protesters, directing someone to conceal cameras and linking with other protesters to stop police from extinguishing a fire at Old Parliament House

On September 4, Bruce Shillingsworth (pictured) was found guilty of aiding and abetting arson by coordinating protesters, directing someone to conceal cameras and linking with other protesters to stop police from extinguishing a fire at Old Parliament House

‘What we wanted to do was go in there and smoke that place out,’ he said.

‘(A) smoking ceremony is a cleansing process. It’s to cleanse out the bad spirits. Trust me there are a lot of bad spirits in that place. That’s where they made those decisions to kill my people.’

The convicted criminal, who is also known for wearing a fake police uniform that is very similar to the actual NSW police uniform, will return to court on October 26 to be sentenced. 

He claims his made-up police force, which he calls ‘Tribal Lore Enforcement’, will ‘take control through power, jurisdiction and authority of tribal lands’. 

Indigenous politicians and elders addressed many of the 40 rallies that took place across Australia over the weekend.

In Melbourne, Indigenous Australians Minister Linda Burney told the 30,000 attendees it was ‘truly overwhelming to look out over this crowd and see you.’ 

‘To know where your hearts are, to know where your spirit lives. And that you, like us, want to embrace this opportunity to move this country forward together,’ she said.

‘For 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been speaking 363 languages, but no voice. In 27 days, you have the power to do something about it.’

In Canberra, Ngunnawal elder Aunty Violet Sheridan said the referendum was not about politics, but ‘respect and justice’.

‘Let’s ensure that our stories, our land, our voices are respected and valued,’ she said.

‘Our voices deserve to be heard in the decisions that shape our lives, the lives of our children, our grandchildren.’

Shillingsworth was accused of being a ringleader of the group that had been camping near the Aboriginal Tent Embassy and damaged Old Parliament House (above)

Shillingsworth was accused of being a ringleader of the group that had been camping near the Aboriginal Tent Embassy and damaged Old Parliament House (above) 

In Brisbane, Quandamooka woman Leeanne Enoch told the crowd of 20,000 that the nation faced a ‘profound turning point’.

‘So I ask all of you to continue the work that you’ve been doing: marching, talking, calling people, having the conversations so we see a Yes vote,’ she said.

Despite the rallies and prominent advertising campaigns such as the young Indigenous boy asking simple questions and another using John Farnham’s You’re The Voice song, polling indicates the referendum will fail. 

The most recent Resolve Political Monitor survey showed just 43 per cent of voters supported a plan to enshrine the Voice into the Constitution, down 20 percentage points from a year ago.

READ MORE: Barnaby Joyce refuses to answer whether he supports changing Australia Day

Fractures in the No campaign about what happens should the Indigenous Voice to Parliament be voted down have let to bizarre scenes on Sunrise.

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce failed to back leading No campaigner Warren Mundine on Monday morning, a day after the Bundjalung man suggested a No vote was the best way to achieve treaty and threw his support behind changing the date of Australia Day.

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce failed to back leading No campaigner Warren Mundine on Monday morning despite being asked five times by Sunrise host Natalie Barr

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce failed to back leading No campaigner Warren Mundine on Monday morning despite being asked five times by Sunrise host Natalie Barr

Content source – www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com

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