Jacinta Price’s parents are physically attacked after the Voice referendum result: ‘Nobody should put up with this nonsense’

Indigenous No campaigner Jacinta Price has revealed her family was egged by strangers and their home vandalised after Saturday’s referendum result.

She revealed her white father David Price was attacked after he and wife Bess Nampijinpa spoke on Sky News Australia on Saturday night in the wake of the Voice vote.

Their home in Alice Springs in the Northern Territory had also been covered in a paint in a unprovoked attack by Yes activists, she said.

‘It was disappointing,’ she told 2GB’s Ben Fordham

‘I’ve come to learn that someone had thrown an egg at my father and some people had at some point thrown paint at their home.

‘So you know, they’re a target.’ 

Indigenous No campaigner Jacinta Price has revealed her family was egged by strangers and their home vandalised after Saturday's referendum

Indigenous No campaigner Jacinta Price has revealed her family was egged by strangers and their home vandalised after Saturday’s referendum

She blamed ‘nasty’ locals in the Red Centre town for the attacks, acting in reprisal for losing the referendum vote. 

‘There’s some pretty nasty individuals in Alice Springs, who obviously don’t like the outcome,’ she said. ‘My concern now and then is their safety. 

‘They shouldn’t have to put up with that kind of nonsense. Nobody should have to put up with that kind of nonsense. 

‘And hopefully that will die down and those individuals will wake up to themselves.’

Footage from the Sky interview reveals people shouting at the couple off-screen as they spoke of their pride in their daughter’s work in the referendum campaign.

Senator Price was appointed shadow minister for Indigenous affairs when the Coalition announced they would be opposing the Indigenous Voice to Parliament.

Her role in the campaign was said to be key to the referendum result but Mr Price told Sky it had enraged some locals in their hometown.

‘This is what we expect,’ he said. ‘This is what we’ve lived with for years and years. 

‘That sort of insane, aggressive abuse, but basically they’re cowards.

‘These people who threaten us and yell at us from passing motorcars, they’ll never face us. They’ve never come up to our faces. 

‘But we’ve lived with that sort of rubbish for years. So you know, it’s something we expect, we’re used to it, and we don’t care much about it really.’

Jacinta Price blamed 'nasty locals' for the attacks on her mother Bess Nampijinpa and father David Price (pictured centre and right above, with senator Price, left)

Jacinta Price blamed ‘nasty locals’ for the attacks on her mother Bess Nampijinpa and father David Price (pictured centre and right above, with senator Price, left)

Senator Jacinta Price's father David (centre) branded the Alice Springs local targeting him and the senator's mother Bess Nampijinpa (right) as 'cowards' on Sky News Australia

Senator Jacinta Price’s father David (centre) branded the Alice Springs local targeting him and the senator’s mother Bess Nampijinpa (right) as ‘cowards’ on Sky News Australia

The senator’s mother was also a Country Liberal Party politician, serving in the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly from 2012 to 2016. 

She is now a school teacher and assistant principal at Yipirinya Independent Aboriginal School in Alice Springs.

‘My people are so tired of being told what to do from Canberra,’ she said.

‘From these people who know nothing about us or our struggles and don’t even want to come and find out exactly what is going on.

‘I am so proud because us as a family, we’re all Australians. And we believe that we should all be treated the same.

‘And this is what Jacinta’s been brought up to believe.’ 

Senator Price said her parents were ‘thrilled’ by the referendum result but said she was ‘slightly sad’ that those who voted against the Voice were being called racists.

‘There will be those that are clearly upset,’ she said. ‘But I’m just hoping that doesn’t turn to further resentment. 

‘We need to we need to work together to solve our problems. We’re a nation where people want what’s best for everybody, and we want to move forward together.’

She added: ‘There is a lot of work that absolutely needs to be done and needs to be focused.

‘I think the Australian people have overwhelmingly demonstrated they no longer want ideal ideological approaches to solving tough problems. 

‘It’s about common sense and being together in how we solve our problems.’

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

Content source – www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com

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